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In Your Own Sweet Way

In Your Own Sweet Way - CD cover

Other Album Covers & Images

In Your Own Sweet Way - The Navy Swings CD cover (see notes)The Navy Swings CD cover (see notes)

Label: Avid Entertainment
Year: 1958
Released on LP: No
Released on CD: Yes

Tracks

1. Gone with the Wind
2. For All We Know
3. Sounds of the Loop
4. Someday My Prince Will Come
5. In You Own Sweet Way
6. Tangerine
7. Watusi Drums
8. Thank You (Dziekuje)
9. Nomad
10. Take the "A" Train
11. I'm in a Dancing Mood
12. St. Louis Blues

Personnel

Dave Brubeck (piano)
Paul Desmond (alto sax)
Joe Morello (drums)
Joe Benjamin (bass)

Notes

1. With the exception of tune introductions/US Navy recruitment statements, this album is identical to “The Navy Swings" CD .

2. These were some of the last recordings that included bassist, Joe Benjamin, before he was replaced by Eugene Wright.

Reviews

All Music Guide – CD - Review – copyright


For a time in the late '50s, the U.S. government hired jazz groups to record transcriptions for free programs distributed to radio stations, such as The Navy Swings. This CD, issued by the English label Avid Entertainment in 2007, includes all of the complete performances from this 1958 program, but eliminates the recurring theme of "The Duke" (which had voice-overs) and the recruiting announcements as well. The quartet, with alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, drummer Joe Morello, and bassist Joe Benjamin (a temporary replacement for Eugene Wright, who took leave to work briefly with Carmen McRae), is in good form, though the performances are briefer than one would expect, simply because the group was following the needs of the military.

This is a great opportunity to hear alternate versions of songs like "Nomad," "Sounds of the Loop," and "I'm in a Dancing Mood," which never really became part of Dave Brubeck's repertoire for the long haul. There's also a trio version of Brubeck's "In Your Own Sweet Way" that surprisingly omits Desmond, and a stunning miniature of the pianist's "Thank You (Dziekuje)." The sound is fairly good, so this obscure release will have some appeal to Brubeck's fans, who should ignore Richard Palmer's often inane liner notes (especially for his referring to the Concord, CA, native being from the South).

Ken Dryden

© Copyright Rovi Corporation

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